Places of Worship during COVID-19

Faith groups and places of worship in Ontario are now allowed to reopen under these restrictions:

  • Physical distancing rules must be in place
  • Attendance is limited to no more than 30 per cent of the indoor building capacity and a maximum of 100 people for outdoor gatherings

Protect the health and safety of your members and congregants by taking measures to preventing the spread of COVID-19. Read on for further resources, including the Health Unit’s COVID-19 Guidance for Reopening Places of Worship. You can also click here for specific Guidelines on Health and Safety for Places of Worship During COVID-19 from Workplace Safety and Prevention Services.

Non-Medical Mask Use During Religious Services
  • The local Health Unit is now including churches/places of worship in the list of indoor public places where people are being instructed to wear non-medical masks.
  • Unless a person is exempted, non-medical masks or face coverings should be worn at all times inside public places. For religious services/rites or ceremonies, indoor weddings and funeral services, attendees must wear masks until seated with a secured physical distance of 2 metres (6 feet) from others.
  • Where speaking or singing is required as a part of a faith-based service, masks may be removed for the purposes of speaking where sufficient distance (greater than 4 metres) is provided between the speaker(s) and participants. In the event of loud speaking or any singing simultaneously during a speaking engagement, masks may be removed with sufficient barrier(s) required, such as glass or Plexiglas that forms a complete barrier between the speaker(s)/singer(s) and others
  • Singers (eg. choir members) or performers do not need to wear a mask while they are rehearsing or performing. Singers and players of brass or wind instruments must be separated from any spectators by Plexiglass or some other impermeable barrier. Every performer and other person must maintain a physical distance of at least two metres from every other person, except, if it is necessary for the performers to be closer to each other for the purposes of the performance or rehearsal. During periods of rest in between performances, face coverings should be used.
Weddings and Funerals

More people are now allowed to attend wedding or funeral services. For indoor ceremonies, the number of people allowed to attend a funeral or wedding can now be a maximum of 30 per cent capacity of the ceremony venue. Wedding and funeral ceremonies taking place outdoors will be limited to 50 attendees. For both indoor and outdoor ceremonies, those attending must follow proper health and safety advice. The number of people allowed to attend receptions afterwards remains at a maximum of 10 people.

COVID-19 Preventive Measures in Places of Worship
  • Maintain physical distancing by staying two metres (six feet) apart at all times.
  • Encourage everyone to wash their hands. Make this easier by putting out more hand-cleaning stations and alcohol-based sanitizer dispensers in your place of worship. 
  • Stop shaking hands or hugging.  
  • Remind people to cough/sneeze into their sleeves. 
  • Review the sharing of items during special religious sacraments/rites, at least while COVID-19 continues to circulate. You may want to consult further with your parish/diocese/denomination/national body. 
  • Maintain a clean and safe space through regular cleaning and disinfecting.
  • Encourage staff and visitors to stay home when sick. 
Stay Connected During COVID-19 in Other Ways
  • Continue to offer virtual or live-streamed services to those who are unable to attend services
  • Keep in touch by phone or via social media/email/text. Share credible information – like what’s on this website on how people can protect themselves from COVID-19. 
  • Adults aged 70 years and older or people with compromised immune systems may be at higher risk of COVID-19. Think about ways that you can reach out to these individuals by phone or electronical means. See if you can assist with essential errands (e.g. groceries, pharmacy pick-up), keeping in mind the importance of protecting your own health by practising physical distancing.
Additional Resources:

Download and print resources below:

COVID-19 and Large Gatherings/Events

As limits on the size of gatherings increase, it’s extra important to prevent COVID-19 when in close contact with other people.

On This Page

Limits on Large Gatherings

Limits on large gatherings in Ontario have been increased as follows: .

  • A maximum of 50 people are allowed at indoor gatherings.
  • Up to 100 people are allowed at outdoor gatherings.
  • In both cases, individuals must maintain physical distancing by staying at least 2 metres (6 feet) apart from other attendees who are outside their household or social circle.

Limits on large gatherings will apply to high-risk settings and activities attended by people. These include: organized or spontaneous indoor and outdoor events (like parties, fundraisers, fairs, wedding receptions, funeral receptions); festivals; casinos, bingo halls and gaming establishments; concerts and live shows (including performing arts); movie theatres; real estate open houses; convention centres and other meeting/event spaces; tour and guide services (like boat tours); recreational attractions, courses and instruction (like fitness classes, music lessons, tutoring);, and facilities for sports/recreational activities (like gyms and fitness studios).

For specific COVID-19 guidelines/rules for certain public settings or situations, click here.

Non-Medical Mask Use Inside Public Spaces

The Health Unit has updated instructions for using non-medical masks/face coverings inside public places. The updated instructions on face coverings could apply to large gatherings/events held inside. Organizers are encouraged to see if their event could be impacted by it.

Social Circles

People are encouraged to create a social circle during COVID-19. A family or social circle allows up to 10 people to interact closely with each other, without the need for physical distancing. These circles would be the only exception when people should not stay 2 metres (6 feet) apart.

Weddings/Funerals

People gathering indoors for religious services, rites or ceremonies, and wedding ceremonies or funeral services, can continue to fill up to 30 per cent of the capacity of the particular room or building, as introduced in Stage 2. For both indoor and outdoor ceremonies, those attending must follow proper health and safety advice, including strict rules around physical distancing. Please also note the Health Unit’s updated instructions for using non-medical masks/face coverings inside public places.

Places of Worship

If you are a church/place of worship, attendance at services is limited to no more than 30 per cent of the building capacity to ensure the safety of worshipers. Strict rules on physical distancing must also be followed. For more information, follow the Ontario Ministry of Health’s COVID-19 Advice for Religious Services, Rites or Ceremonies. Please also note the Health Unit’s updated instructions for using non-medical masks/face coverings inside public places, including churches and places of worships.

General Tips for Event Planning During COVID-19

If organizing or attending a large gathering/event like a concert, festival, worship service or cultural/sporting event, you need to make an informed decision. Many people in close contact in one location for a long time can lead to the spread of respiratory illnesses. Other factors also come into play, such as venue cleanliness, crowd size, health and age of attendees, and number of high-touch areas (like doors, elevators).

Organizers
  • Each event is different, so assess the type, size, scope and need for it. Consider the number of people who may attend too.
  • Consider specific COVID-19 prevention guidelines that are in place for events, including limits on the number of attendees. For further direction, call the Health Unit at 1-866-888-4577, ext. 5020.
  • If you still plan to hold an event, assess the risk and take steps to reduce the spread of illness. Consider things like:
    • Reducing the number of participants or changing the venue to prevent crowding
    • Thinking about who will attend. If they are older or have weak immune systems/pre-existing health conditions, they may be at higher risk of getting sick from illnesses like COVID-19
    • Staggering arrivals and departures
    • Providing packaged refreshments instead of a buffet
    • Increasing access to handwashing stations
    • Promoting personal protective practices (hand hygiene, respiratory etiquette, staying home if ill)
    • Offering virtual or live-streamed activities
    • Changing the event program to reduce high risk activities such as those that require physical contact between participants.
  • These resources offer further guidance to assess risks and take steps to reduce spread of illness at events:
Attendees
  • Avoid events/gatherings if you are sick. Stay home, except to get medical care. Use Ontario’s online COVID-19 Self-Assessment Tool to see what further care is needed.
  • Use precautions if attending a large event. Wash hands frequently with soap and water (or alcohol-based hand sanitizer). Cover cough/sneeze. Keep a two-metre (6-foot) distance from others as much as possible. Wear a non-medical mask or face covering.

Farmers’ Markets and COVID-19


For Farmers/Vendors

During COVID-19, farmers who sell locally-grown and sourced foods in Haliburton County, Northumberland County and the City of Kawartha Lakes must keep the health and safety of the community top of mind.  

During this pandemic, the Health Unit encourages local farmers’ markets to consider selling goods online. This is the best approach to use at this time. There are a number of e-commerce options to consider, including REKO Canada (a Finnish trade and fair consumption model used locally) and Open Food Network (an online partnership linked to the Farmers’ Markets Ontario). 

If you plan to organize a farmers’ market this season, you must first submit a detailed plan to the Health Unit. Public Health Inspectors will review and approve all submissions before any market can open or operate. Proposals must include details on how the market will maintain physical distancing, ensure proper handwashing, and follow appropriate cleaning/protocols. 

Criteria for E-Commerce/E-Market Proposals 

If your farmers’ market uses online payment options and lets customers drive or walk through to pick-up pre-ordered and prepaid food, you must include the following details in your proposal:    

  1. Confirmation that the landlord/property owner approves of the use for farmers’ market (Note: During COVID-19, many local municipalities are not allowing markets to set up on their property) 
  2. A written plan showing traffic circulation 
  3. A delivery plan based on the number of orders and drive-up customers. Consider staggering pick-up times based on a person’s last name (For example: People with last names starting with A-E can pick up from 9-9:30am, F-J from 9:30-10am, etc.)  
  4. Guidelines on how to ensure customers stay in their vehicles when picking up food 
  5. Plans to ensure customers walking to pick up orders maintain physical distance with vendors and other customers  
  6. Similar plans to ensure vendors/ volunteers maintain physical distancing 
  7. Locations where vendors/volunteers can access handwashing/alcohol-based hand sanitizing facilities  
  8. Written confirmation from vendors that they will not handle food or take part in the market if they are sick. Vendors will self-screen for COVID-19 symptoms 
  9. Types of products and how often they’re used to clean and disinfect surfaces where food orders are placed/organized (For example, after each order use household cleaners or diluted bleach solution of 1-part bleach to 9 parts water) 
  10. Ways that food products will be packaged so they are not loose 
  11. Process to ensure food orders are prepackaged in new, single-use boxes/bags and labelled with customer names or order numbers 
  12. Plans to ensure all refrigerated and frozen products are maintained at proper temperatures 
  13. A pledge to keep a list of vendors and all food products that each sell 
  14. Confirmation from each vendor that the food is obtained from an approved source:  
  • Meats ONLY come from an approved slaughterhouse and processed at approved facilities  
  • Dairy products ONLY made from pasteurized milk 
  • Perishable food requiring refrigeration during transport and distribution is maintained out of the danger zone (refrigerated) 

For questions or to submit your farmers’ market proposal, email the Health Unit at inspections@hkpr.on.ca. You can also call 1-866-888-4577, ext. 5006. 

A Public Health Inspector will review the proposal and respond to you. An inspection may also be needed to confirm the market is operating as outlined in the proposal. 

Additional Resources: 


For Shoppers/Customers
  • Follow the directions/guidance of food market organizers, especially if picking up food items in a ‘drive-through’ style market setting 
  • If picking up food items on foot, practise physical distancing by staying two metres (six feet) from other customers and vendors  
  • Minimize time at the market. Prepare a list for efficient shopping/pick up 
  • If possible, use alcohol-based sanitizer after pickup at each vendor 
  • Avoid touching your face 
  • Wear a non-medical mask or face covering if you want. It can help reduce the spread of COVID-19 to others. 
  • After returning home, wash your hands with soap and water for 20 seconds  
  • As always, wash produce with running water before eating or preparing food. And remember… there is no evidence that food or food packaging can spread COVID-19!  

Community Gardens and COVID-19

Community gardens are allowed to open during COVID-19.

The Health Unit is offering recommendations to community gardens that operate in Haliburton County, Northumberland County and the City of Kawartha Lakes to protect the health and safety of everyone during COVID-19. Below are the minimum standards that all community gardens must have in place before opening. 

Use these standards as a starting point to begin planning and developing specific COVID-19 policies and protocols for your community garden. Be sure to communicate these plans to all garden members. You are also required to update information with the Health Unit. 

Entrance Restrictions/Requirements
  • Members of the public are not allowed into the gardens. Only garden members are allowed (NOTE: Please find a downloadable, printable ‘Closed’ sign to put up in your community garden)
  • Garden members cannot visit the garden if they show symptoms of COVID-19, are feeling sick from something they ate or drank, or have been in contact with someone with COVID-19
  • Post signs around the garden on COVID-19 symptoms, physical distancing, and handwashing. Policies and protocols relating to the coronavirus should also be put up at all entrances and throughout the garden
  • Use a ‘sign-in and sign-out system’ to track who is in the garden each day 
  • Update the list of current registered members, staff and volunteers involved in the community garden. Track those who have agreed to participate under COVID-19 policies and protocols
Physical Distancing
  • Only allow a maximum of five people to work in the community garden at any one time (For example, develop a schedule where plots are numbered, and odd/even numbered plots come on different days)
  • Maintain physical distancing when two or more gardeners are present. Keep at least two metres (six feet) apart from others
  • If people plan to wear homemade/personal masks in the garden, follow this Public Health Ontario fact sheet on how to properly wear and throw away mask.
  • Remember wearing rubber gloves out in public does not reduce the risk of COVID-19. Handwashing with soap/water or hand sanitizer and not touching your face offer more protection 
  • If gardeners choose to wear mask and rubber gloves, wash hands before putting on the mask/gloves and after taking them off
  • Masks and rubber gloves must be disposed of in a lined garbage bin only
Hand Hygiene/Handwashing
  • Provide handwashing or alcohol-based hand sanitizer (with 60 to 90% alcohol content) stations
  • Encourage all gardeners to regularly wash/sanitize hands, especially before entering and after leaving the garden  
  • Gardeners should know that if their hands are visibly soiled, they must first wash them with soap and water or wipe them before applying alcohol-based hand sanitizer
Garden Equipment and Tools – Use and Cleaning Requirements
  • Ask garden members to bring their own tools, or assign select tools and tasks to individuals or smaller groups
  • Avoid sharing garden gloves. Gardeners should take their gloves home to wash after each use 
  • Use gardening techniques that reduce the need for frequent trips to the garden (For example: use mulch to reduce the need for watering/weeding, row covers to prevent pests, etc.)
  • Create and implement procedures to clean and disinfect all shared tools before and after garden work
  • Regularly clean gardening tools with soap and water to remove organic matter. First rinse off soap with water, then disinfect. Use either a mixture of 1 Tbsp. of household (5%) bleach and 1 litre of warm water (mix a fresh batch each day) with 10 minutes contact time OR commercial Lysol or Clorox disinfectant with contact time indicated on label for disinfecting
  • Ensure regular cleaning and disinfecting of high-touch surfaces such as doorknobs, padlocks, water spigots, gates handle, railings etc.
  • When bringing home garden produce, wash any vegetables and fruit under clean running water (not soapy water) before eating 
Notifying the Health Unit

You must notify the Health Unit of your plans to operate a community garden this growing season. Contact the Health Unit at 1-866-888-4577, ext. 5006, or inspections@hkpr.on.ca to provide the following information:

  • Name and location of your community garden
  • Whether there are plans to open the community garden this year
  • Confirmation that you have received the Health Unit’s Checklist for Community Gardens and the Ontario’s Ministry of Health’s guidance document for operating a community garden 
  • Agreement that you will follow these directions open your garden  
Additional Resources

Printable COVID-19 Resources

Download and print resources below:

Image of Screening Survey for Employees AODA compliant poster – click to download
Image of Screening Survey for Employees AODA compliant poster – click to download

COVID-19 Screening Survey for Employees

Image of Attention Staff AODA compliant poster – click to download
Image of Attention Staff AODA compliant poster – click to download

Attention Staff
Poster

Image of Are You Sick? AODA compliant poster – click to download
Image of Are You Sick? AODA compliant poster – click to download

Are You Sick?
Poster

Image of Attention Shoppers AODA compliant poster – click to download
Image of Attention Shoppers AODA compliant poster – click to download

Attention Shoppers
Poster

Image of Attention Visitors AODA compliant poster - click to download
Image of Attention Visitors AODA compliant poster – click to download

Attention Visitors
Poster

Image of AODA compliant 'Keep Your Distance on Elevators' poster - click as a link
Image of AODA compliant ‘Keep Your Distance on Elevators’ poster – click as a link

Keep Distance on Elevators
Poster

Prevention poster for customers or visitors to a workplace
Prevention Customers

Prevention for Customers
Poster

Prevent the spread poster which can be used in the community
Prevention Community

Prevention in the Community
Poster

Prevention poster for tenants
Prevention for Tenants

Prevention for Tenants
Poster

Image of AODA compliant 'Community Garden Provincial Orders' poster - click as a link
Image of AODA compliant ‘Community Garden Provincial Orders’ poster – click as a link

Community Garden Provincial Orders
Poster

Image of AODA compliant 'Stay Home During COVID-19' poster - click as a link
Image of AODA compliant ‘Stay Home During COVID-19’ poster – click as a link

Stay Home During COVID-19
Poster

Image of AODA compliant 'Doctors Orders' poster - click as a link
Image of AODA compliant ‘Doctors Orders’ poster – click as a link

Doctor’s Orders
Poster

Cleaning and Disinfection for Public Spaces

Cleaning and disinfecting public spaces is essential to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and protect people in the community.

The following information provides guidance on cleaning and disinfection of public spaces and workplaces in Ontario.

What you should know
  • Commonly used cleaners and disinfectants are effective against COVID-19. Click here for a specific list of hard-surface disinfectants that are known to be effective against COVID-19.
  • Frequently touched surfaces are most likely to be contaminated.
  • Use only disinfectants that have a Drug Identification Number (DIN). A DIN is an 8-digit number given by Health Canada that confirms it is approved for use in Canada.
  • Check the expiry date of products you use and always follow manufacturer’s instructions.
  • Follow these public health guidelines for cleaning/disinfecting public washrooms
Icon image of a tub of cleaning supplies
Clean frequently touched surfaces twice per day
  • In addition to routine cleaning, high-touch surfaces should be cleaned and disinfected twice per day and when visibly dirty.
  • High-touch surfaces can include: doorknobs, elevator buttons, light switches, toilet handles, counters, hand rails, touch screen surfaces and keypads.
  • In addition to routine cleaning, check with your organization for any specific protocols for cleaning for COVID-19.
Select products
Cleaners
  • Break down grease and remove organic material from the surface.
  • Used separately before using disinfectants.
  • Can be purchased with cleaner and disinfectant combined in a single product
Icon of a sponge filled with bubbles
Disinfectants
Icon of a spray bottle of disinfectant
Disinfectant Wipes
  • Have combined cleaners and disinfectants in one solution.
  • May become dry due to fast drying properties. Should be discarded if they become dry.
  • Not recommended for heavily soiled surfaces.
Prepare products for use
  • Where possible, use pre-mixed solution.
  • Read and follow manufacturer’s instructions to:
    • properly prepare solution
    • allow adequate contact time for disinfectant to kill germs (see product label)
    • wear gloves when handling cleaning products including wipes
    • wear any other personal protective equipment recommended by the manufacturer.
Watch our video on YouTube

This information is based on the Public Health Ontario fact sheet: Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Cleaning and Disinfection for Public Settings

Additional Resources:

Download and print resources below:

Temporary Foreign Workers and COVID-19

The local Health Unit works closely with area farmers to ensure temporary (or migrant) workers can work safely during COVID-19.

Section 22 Order For Agriculture Farms Employing Migrant Workers

The Haliburton, Kawartha, Pine Ridge District Health Unit has issued a Section 22 Class Order to all owners and operators of agricultural farms that employ migrant farm workers, participate in the federal Temporary Farm Worker (TFW) or operate any model of seasonal housing accommodations. The order applies to these agricultural farms in Haliburton County, Northumberland County and the City of Kawartha Lakes.

The Order is effective from 12 pm (noon) July 9, 2020 and will remain in effect until the local Medical Officer of Health determines it is no longer required. The Order requires all owners and operators of agricultural operations to take additional steps to reduce the risk of COVID-19 for farm workers and local residents. Please read this Fact Sheet for more detailed information on the Order.


FAQs

Is this Order limited to seasonal housing accommodations for migrant workers or Temporary Farm Workers (TFWs) only?

This Section 22 Class Order applies to all owners and operators of agricultural farms that employ migrant farm workers, or participate in the federal Temporary Farm Worker (TFW) or operate any model of seasonal housing accommodations, including seasonal housing for non-migrant workers, which may include local residents, students or others.

Does this Order restrict a migrant worker from working at more than one farm or if they are staying in a seasonal accommodation at one of the farms they are working on?

Yes. Note that local workers such as students are also included in this Order and should only be working at one farm.

By working ‘exclusively at one workplace,’ does this Order prohibit a migrant worker from working at a roadside stand or farmer’s market?

No. The migrant worker would still be considered as working in the same workplace, just a different location (such as a different field). The intent is they are not working with other workers from a different farm. This is especially important to remember if working at a farmer’s market. Migrant and local workers from one farm should not interact with those from another agricultural operation.

Is there a difference between single unit accommodations versus group or multiple persons residing in the same accommodation?

No. They mean the same thing.


Additional Resource

Advice for Agricultural/Farm Owners and Operators – HKPR District Health Unit

Working With Farm Operators to Stop the Spread of COVID-19 on Farms – Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs

Health Unit Role

The Health Unit works to protect the health of workers and the well-being of the entire community by preventing the spread of the virus. This ensures area farms operate safely and by the rules, while allowing our local communities to stay well-fed and have access to quality, locally-produced food items.

During COVID-19, the Health Unit follows provincial directives and federal guidelines for temporary foreign workers. Throughout the growing season, our Public Health Inspectors work directly with local farmers and migrant workers to ensure these guidelines are followed to the letter of the law. Some of the provisions include: 

  • Regular housing/accommodation inspections
  • Requiring temporary workers to self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival in Canada
  • Doing ongoing screening of workers for COVID-19 symptoms and putting in place provisions that they fully isolate themselves from others if they get sick
  • Making sure farmers do their part to protect the health of workers. This means: providing appropriate hygiene facilities/supplies, promoting physical distancing measures (such as making sure worker accommodations allow for at least 2-metre distance), and regular cleaning and disinfecting of surfaces.  

For more information on Health Unit efforts, call 1-866-888-4577, ext. 5006.

Advice for Agricultural/Farm Owners and Operators

How to Reduce the Spread of Illness
  • Workers should be educated on how to self-monitor for symptoms of COVID-19.
  • Encourage regular hand hygiene by following proper handwashing and hand sanitizing methods.
  • Post hand hygiene signs in visible locations (like in washrooms, above sinks, dispenser holders).
  • Alcohol-based hand rubs (ABHR) onsite should have an alcohol concentration between 70%- 90%.
  • Liquid handsoap, paper towels and ABHR dispensers should be checked regularly to ensure they are full. Single-use, disposable products are preferred. If using refillable dispensers, ensure they are cleaned first followed by disinfection between refills.
  • Post additional posters as needed in high-visible locations to reinforce the message not to spread germs and cover your cough. Find printable resources here.
  • Practise proper respiratory etiquette. This includes coughing/sneezing into your sleeve or a tissue (not your hand). Wash hands with soap and water or ABHR immediately afterwards.
  • Clean and disinfect commonly-touched surfaces regularly and more often when someone is ill. These include doorknobs, light switches, handrails, faucets, fridge handles, keyboards, and phones.
  • Never share items that come into contact with the mouth or nose such as toothbrushes, eating/drinking utensils, or cigarettes/smoking devices.
  • Personal grooming items should not be shared (like hand towels, combs, brushes, shaving equipment, and nail cutters). Personal items should be kept separate for each worker.
  • Only allow one person at a time to use shared spaces such as the kitchen, bathroom or TV room. If necessary, create a schedule for workers to use common spaces in shifts to maintain physical distancing (2 metres or 6 feet apart from others). Reconfigure common spaces so seating ensures physical distancing. These areas should be cleaned and disinfected after each use.
  • Workers should not eat together unless physical distancing is possible. Try to get them to eat at different times or have workers eat meals in their own rooms. Be sure to clean all surfaces between meal seatings.
  • Remove shared food containers from dining areas (like pitchers of water, salt and pepper shakers).
  • Encourage workers to remain in their room as much as possible. If rooms are shared, workers should keep as far apart from each other to maintain the 2 metre (6 foot) distance requirement.
  • Arrange for the delivery of groceries and other personal items to reduce the need for workers to leave the farm.
  • Contact the Health Unit at 1-866-888-4577, ext. 5020, if any of your workers screen positive for COVID-19 during your daily active screening.
  • Notify the Health Unit immediately if any migrant worker needs to leave the farm/isolation location for ANY reason during the 14-day isolation period. This could include seeking medical attention.
What To Do if a Worker Becomes Ill
  • If a worker reports or shows symptoms of COVID-19 or may have been exposed to someone with the virus, immediately
    • Separate and self-isolate the individual from others
    • Call the Health Unit at 1-866-888-4577, ext. 5020, for further direction
  • The worker must be isolated for 14 days in separate, dedicated quarters used for isolating sick employees
  • If a private accommodation is not possible, a symptomatic individual must have his/her own private bedroom and bathroom. Ensure:
    • The room has good airflow (open windows as weather permits)
    • The ill worker can be kept 2 metres away from others who are not sick
    • Workers wear a surgical/procedure mask if they are to leave their room.
    • Meals are brought to sick workers. If possible, use single-use cutlery or dishes and properly dispose of them in a garbage bag. If re-usable cutlery or dishes are used, avoid touching the items directly (such as placing them on a tray). Wash your hands with soap and water and immediately wash the dishes as well
    • Hand sanitizer is present in the room. If the room must be shared by more than one individual with confirmed COVID-19, they are not required to wear masks.
  • If the worker must be tested at a COVID-19 Assessment Centre, arrange private transportation by having the worker wear a surgical/procedure mask, sit alone in the backseat and open the car windows if possible. The driver should wear a mask.
  • In most cases, sick individuals can recover on the farm. They should be monitored several times a day to ensure symptoms do not worsen.
  • If the unwell worker gets worse and needs to go to the hospital because of severe symptoms (like severe difficulty breathing, severe chest pain, difficulty waking up, confusion, loss of consciousness), call 9-1-1 and let responders know the person is suspected of having COVID-19.
Additional Recommendations for Agricultural Workplaces
  • Screen all workers upon arrival each day using screening criteria. Isolate any person with symptoms and conduct a further assessment.
  • Stagger meetings and breaks to minimize the number of workers in one place.
  • Designate travel paths so workers do not have to pass each other closely or have workers call out before entering a shared space.
  • Hold meetings outside or in a large area to allow people to stay apart 2-metres (6-feet).
  • Provide access to handwashing stations or hand sanitizer dispensers in prominent locations throughout the site. If hands are visibly dirty, they must be washed with soap and water.
  • Clean offices, washrooms, lunchrooms, trailers, workspaces and other shared spaces at least once a day. Focus on commonly touched surfaces such as pens, tools, radios, tables, chairs, handles, handrails, kettles, microwaves, and light switches.
  • Clean shared tools with alcohol or disinfectant wipes. Wear gloves if cleaning is not practical.
  • Assign one driver/operator per vehicle if possible. Clean and disinfect vehicles between uses (steering wheel, gear shift, controls, interior/exterior door handles, etc.)
  • Ensure farm employees are assigned to the same team/group/work pod that is separated from other individuals and teams.
  • Within the team/work pod, workers should maintain a 2 metre (6-foot) physical distance from others as best as possible. The need for Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) should be based on a risk assessment. Speak to the Health Unit for more guidance on PPE.

COVID-19 – For Groups/Organizations

COVID-19 has changed many things in your day-to-day life, including the work of many community organizations and groups. Learn more about how your group can adapt to the new normal of coronavirus by taking steps to protect staff, clients and volunteers.

Key Links:
Frequently Asked Questions

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Community gardens are allowed to open during COVID-19. The Health Unit is offering recommendations to community gardens that operate in Haliburton County, Northumberland County and the City of Kawartha Lakes to protect the health and safety of everyone during COVID-19. Below are the minimum standards that all community gardens must ...
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Group of people walking down a hallway
As limits on the size of gatherings increase, it's extra important to prevent COVID-19 when in close contact with other people. On This Page Limits on Large GatheringsNon-Medical Mask Use Inside Public Places Social CirclesWeddings/FuneralsPlaces of WorshipGeneral Tips for Event Planning During COVID-19 Limits on Large Gatherings Limits on large ...
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Buy Local at the Farmer's Market. Greengrocer selling organic fresh agricultural product at farmer market. Female Stall Holder At Farmers Fresh Food Market
On this page:For Farmers/VendorsCriteria for E-Commerce/E-Market Proposals For Shoppers/Customers For Farmers/Vendors During COVID-19, farmers who sell locally-grown and sourced foods in Haliburton County, Northumberland County and the City of Kawartha Lakes must keep the health and safety of the community top of mind. During this pandemic, the Health Unit encourages local farmers’ markets to ...
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Close up image of empty church pews
Faith groups and places of worship in Ontario are now allowed to reopen under these restrictions: Physical distancing rules must be in placeAttendance is limited to no more than 30 per cent of the indoor building capacity and a maximum of 100 people for outdoor gatherings Protect the health and ...
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Printer Start, Finger pressing the start button on a multifunction printer or copier
Download and print resources below: Protect Yourself and OthersPoster Wear a Mask or Face CoveringPoster Wear a Mask with ExemptionsPoster When to Wear Masks in a RestaurantPoster As business and retail stores reopenPoster Tips for choosing a non-medical maskPoster How to keep safe non-medical maskPoster Image of Screening Survey for ...
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Bunch of organic vitamin carrot holding in hand
The local Health Unit works closely with area farmers to ensure temporary (or migrant) workers can work safely during COVID-19. Section 22 Order For Agriculture Farms Employing Migrant Workers The Haliburton, Kawartha, Pine Ridge District Health Unit has issued a Section 22 Class Order to all owners and operators of ...
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