COVID-19 Cases and Testing

Resources

Have you tested positive for COVID-19 or been exposed to someone with the virus? Need information about how and where to get tested? Learn what your next steps should be.


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You Have COVID-19 or Have Been Exposed to a Case

In certain cases, you MUST isolate or quarantine to prevent the spread of COVID-19. This is a legal requirement imposed by the Health Unit under its Section 22 Order issued under the Health Protection and Promotion Act

In general, you must isolate if:

  • You are diagnosed with COVID-19.
  • You have the signs and symptoms of COVID-19, have been tested and are awaiting the results.
  • You believe you have COVID-19 symptoms (even mild ones).

You must quarantine if are identified as a high-risk close contact of someone who has COVID-19, is awaiting test results or is believed to have symptoms.

Public health staff will contact you by phone or email to give you further direction on what to do and how long to isolate or quarantine, depending on your situation.  (**NOTE: Due to workload issues, Public Health Ontario is assisting with follow-up with COVID-19 case and contacts in Northumberland County, Haliburton County and the City of Kawartha Lakes. You may be contacted by public health staff from this organization. Please follow their guidance to help stop the spread of COVID-19).

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Related Pages
Video Resources
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COVID-19 Testing

Stop the spread. Get tested for COVID-19 as needed or directed.

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COVID-19 Vaccination Clinics


Health Unit mass immunization clinics are still open in Minden, Fenelon Falls, Lindsay and Cobourg. Please note new clinic times: 2-7 pm.

NOTE: If your COVID-19 vaccine appointment is booked after August 15, you will be getting a phone call from staff with Ontario’s Ministry of Health in the next few days. The phone call will inform you that your appointment is cancelled. Ministry staff will be able to help you rebook an appointment sooner or find a nearby walk-in clinic for a vaccine without an appointment. Please note: Incoming calls will be from phone number 1-888-999-6488. Read further for more information.

More dates are being added in August and can be viewed in the provincial booking system. You can also walk-in for a vaccine at any of the clinics on the dates they are open. Please see the list below for clinic dates, times and locations.

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How to Get the COVID-19 Vaccine:

  • Walk-In: anyone age 12+ can now “walk-in” for a first or second dose of COVID-19 vaccine at any of the Health Unit vaccination clinics in Cobourg, Fenelon Falls, Minden and Campbellford on scheduled clinic dates. No appointments are needed, but please bring your Ontario Health Card if you have one.
  • Click here for upcoming clinic dates and locations.
  • Book An Appointment: if you are 12+, you can book through the provincial booking system (www.ontario.ca/bookvaccine) or by calling 1-833-943-3900.
  • Rebooking a Second Dose Appointment: second dose appointments scheduled after August 3 have been cancelled. If your second dose appointment has been cancelled, please rebook your appointment sooner, visit a clinic as a walk-in, or visit a pharmacy to get your vaccine.
Second Doses

In Ontario, the second dose for COVID-19 vaccines is now given at 28 days after the first dose. If you received the AstraZeneca vaccine as your first dose, you can now get your second dose after eight to 12 weeks. Your second dose can be Pfizer or Moderna, as Ontario allows the mixing of vaccines.

If you had a second dose appointment scheduled after August 3, it has been cancelled. Please rebook your appointment through the provincial booking system, visit a clinic as a walk-in, or visit a pharmacy to get your vaccine sooner.

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Local Vaccination Clinics

Health Unit mass immunization clinics are still open Minden, Campbellford Fenelon Falls, Lindsay and Cobourg. More dates are being added in August and can be viewed in the provincial booking system. You can also walk-in for a vaccine at any of the clinics on the dates they are open.

Northumberland County
Cobourg
  • Cobourg Community Centre750 D’Arcy Street, Cobourg (view map)
    • Clinics run from 2-7 pm on August 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12.
    • You can now “walk in” for a first or second dose of COVID-19 vaccine at this vaccination clinic. Please bring your Ontario Health Card.
Campbellford
  • Campbellford and District Curling and Racquet Club381 Front Street North, Campbellford (view map)
    • Clinics run 2 pm to 7 pm on Aug. 4, 6, 7, 9, 11, 13, 14 (walk-ins welcome)
    • You can now “walk in” for a first or second dose of COVID-19 vaccine at this vaccination clinic. Please bring your Ontario Health Card.
    • Watch this Health Unit video on what to expect when you arrive at the Campbellford and District Curling and Racquet Club for your vaccine appointment.
City of Kawartha Lakes
Lindsay
  • Lindsay Exhibition (LEX)354 Angeline Street South, Lindsay (view map)
    • Clinics are held Monday to Friday, 9 am to 5 pm
    • The LEX Clinic will operate as a drive-through model, meaning individuals will remain in their vehicles for the duration of their appointment. There will be signage and hospital staff on-site to help navigate where to go.
    • Those with appointments are asked to arrive approximately 10 minutes prior to their appointment time to check in. Individuals being vaccinated should wear a loose, comfortable shirt and must bring their Ontario health card.
    • Walk-ins for first and second doses are now available. Anyone age 12+ can show up at the LEX Monday to Friday between 8 am to 2 pm for COVID-19 vaccine. No appointment is needed.
Fenelon Falls
  • Fenelon Falls Community Centre27 Veterans Way, Fenelon Falls (view map)
    • Clinics run from 2-7 pm on Aug. 6, 7, 8, 13, 14 (walk-ins welcome)
    • You can now “walk in” for a first or second dose of COVID-19 vaccine at this vaccination clinic. Please bring your Ontario Health Card.
Haliburton County
Haliburton

The Health Unit’s clinic in Haliburton in now closed. If you received your first dose at the Health Unit’s Haliburton clinic, you will need to visit another clinic location to receive your second dose.


Minden
  • Minden Community Centre55 Parkside Street, Minden (view map)
    • Clinics run from 2-7 pm on August 3, 4, 11, 12.
    • You can now “walk in” for a first or second dose of COVID-19 vaccine at this vaccination clinic. Please bring your Ontario Health Card.
Please note:
  • If you have received a dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine, click here for an After-Care Fact Sheet.
  • There have been a small number of reports of pericarditis (inflammation of the lining around the heart) or myocarditis (inflammation of the heart muscle) after getting a COVID-19 mRNA vaccine in Canada. Click here to learn more in this Public Health Ontario fact sheet.
  • Before your COVID-19 vaccine appointment, drink water and eat something ahead of time. Being well-hydrated and having something in your stomach reduces your risk of feeling faint after your shot.
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Pharmacy Locations

Hundreds of Ontario pharmacies are now offering COVID-19 vaccinations for eligible residents. This includes select pharmacies in Haliburton County, Northumberland County and the City of Kawartha Lakes.

For a full list of pharmacies offering COVID-19 vaccines, visit Ontario’s Pharmacy COVID-19 Vaccine page. You can search the list of participating pharmacies by community or using your postal code.

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Community Health Centres/Family Health Teams

Some local Community Health Centres and Family Health Teams are receiving vaccine and are hosting “pop up” or mobile vaccination clinics. Please contact your local Family Health Team or Community Health Centre directly for more details.

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Additional Resources:


Youth and COVID-19 Vaccination

The time is right for youth to get vaccinated against COVID-19.

Individuals aged 12 to 17 years are encouraged to get their first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccine as soon as possible. This will ensure they are fully vaccinated when school resumes in September.

The Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine has been approved for use in individuals aged 12 to 17 and the vaccine is available at Health Unit’s clinics.


Youth can get the vaccine the following ways:


What you need to know:

  • Pfizer vaccine will be administered for youth ages 12 to 17 years.
  • Some local pharmacies may also provide youth vaccinations and should be contacted directly to book appointments.
  • As well, primary health care providers may also offer vaccinations to their younger patients and their families.
  • In Ontario, the second dose for vaccines is now given at 28 days after the first dose for anyone 12 years and older.

Additional Resources:


Vaccination Fact and Fiction

MYTH: It is not safe for young people to get the COVID-19 vaccine.

FACT: The COVID-19 vaccine is safe for young people and Health Canada has approved use for people 12 years of age and up. Safety is based on research from scientific trials and they continue to closely monitor the vaccine as more people get it.

MYTH: There are only a few different COVID-19 vaccines.

FACT: There are 4 vaccines approved for use in Canada: Pfizer, Moderna, AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson. Worldwide, there are 102 COVID-19 vaccines in use and another 184 COVID-19 vaccines in progress.

MYTH: The vaccine is going to change or interact with my DNA.

FACT: The vaccine does not change or interact with your DNA. The mRNA vaccines teach your body to know the code for the COVID-19 protein spike, like a recipe that can fight COVID-19 virus. It does not alter or interact with your DNA.

MYTH: There are microchips/metal/magnets in the vaccine.

FACT: There are no metals, magnets, or microchips in the vaccine. The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines include mRNA (messenger ribonucleic acid) which is naturally found in every cell in your body. The specific mRNA found in the vaccine is directed towards creating a protein spike that is like a recipe to help you fight COVID-19. Other ingredients in the vaccine are water, fat, sugar, sodium, and potassium. These are needed to help the mRNA deliver this recipe. Your body creates the protein spike and then no longer needs the recipe, so it breaks it down to get rid of it, leaving only the protein spike needed to fight COVID-19.

MYTH: The COVID-19 vaccine was made too quickly for the science behind it so it can’t be safe.

FACT: The COVID-19 vaccine is very safe. The mRNA type of vaccine was developed in the early 1990s and has had 30 years of research with animal trials. This research was used in the development of the COVID-19 vaccines, like Pfizer and Moderna. They are safe and effective.

MYTH: The government is forcing people to get the vaccine.

FACT: Getting the COVID19 vaccine is completely voluntary. No one is being forced to get it. Vaccination is our best chance to end the pandemic and to get back to enjoying our lives. In the future, there might be things that only fully vaccinated people are allowed to do such as travelling to other countries or attending events with large gatherings of people, like concerts or festivals. Being vaccinated means that you and the people around you will be safer and feel less worried about catching COVID-19.

MYTH: People get sick or get COVID-19 after they get the vaccine.

FACT: The mRNA vaccine is not a live vaccine and does not contain any COVID-19 virus so it cannot give you COVID-19. After you get the vaccine, it can cause a short-lived response as your immune system builds the protein spike or recipe needed to fight COVID-19. Side effects can be feeling tired, headache, sore arm, or not feeling well. The COVID-19 vaccine is over 90% effective against the virus once you have had 2 doses, but that is not 100%. In rare situations, a fully vaccinated person could get sick with COVID-19 and their symptoms might be milder than if they were not vaccinated.

MYTH: I don’t need to be vaccinated because I already had COVID-19.

FACT: It is important to get your COVID-19 vaccine even if you have already had COVID-19. Although you might have some immunity to the virus from having had COVID-19, it is unknown how long that will last or if your antibodies will recognize new COVID-19 variants.

MYTH: I have allergies/a health condition/take medication, so it isn’t safe for me to get the vaccine.

FACT: There are hardly any reasons for someone not to get the vaccine even if they have a health condition and take medications. Sometimes health conditions and medications can make a person at higher risk of complications from COVID-19 so getting the vaccine is even more important for them. Prior to giving you the vaccine, the vaccinator will ask questions to find out more about your health, medications, and allergies. As far as allergies go, the mRNA vaccines do not contain many of the components found in other vaccines that can lead to allergic reactions, such as pork, egg, or gluten. If you have concerns, consult with your family doctor.

MYTH: Kids who get COVID-19 only have mild symptoms, so they do not need to be vaccinated.

FACT: Kids can get sick from COVID-19 and rarely, even be hospitalized. Kids need to be vaccinated because even though they might not get as sick from COVID-19, they can spread it to other people who can get extremely sick. Vaccinating youth helps our whole community. It will be a key step towards ending this pandemic.

MYTH: Only getting 1 shot of the COVID-19 vaccine will be good enough protection for me.

FACT: The mRNA vaccine was designed as a 2-dose set. The first shot teaches your body to make the protein spike which is a recipe your body follows to fight COVID-19. Your body’s immune response to the 1st shot rises, but scientists believe that decreases over time. The 2nd shot reminds your body of that protein spike recipe to give you longer-lasting protection.

MYTH: Once I get the vaccine, I can stop wearing my mask and start hanging out with friends and family again.

FACT: No, not yet. As a population we need enough people to be vaccinated with a full 2 doses before we can relax our current safety measures such as wearing a mask, social distancing, hand sanitizing/cleaning and staying home as much as possible. Once case numbers are low and the percentage of people who are fully vaccinated increases, we will be able to make changes to our current safety measures. In the meantime, encourage your friends and family to get the vaccine.


COVID-19 News/Media Releases

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Media Releases

2021

July 2021

June 2021

May 2021

April 2021

March 2021

February 2021

January 2021


2020

December 2020

November 2020

October 2020

September 2020

August 2020

July 2020

June 2020

May 2020

April 2020

March 2020

January 2020


Follow us for COVID-19 Updates

You can find and follow updates on COVID-19 in your local community via the following HKPR resources:

If you have questions about COVID-19, you can contact the Health Unit at 1-866-888-4577 x5020 or email at info@hkpr.on.ca

COVID-19 and Schools

The Health Unit continues to work closely with local school boards and other public health units to ensure a safe return for all students, staff and families. Please read on for more information and resources for parents, school board staff and students.

Current Situation
  • A return to in-person learning at schools is expected for the start of the next academic year in September 2021.
  • Child care for non-school aged children will remain open, but before and after school programs will be closed. Free emergency child care for the school-aged children of eligible health care and frontline workers will be provided. 

On This Page

For Parents
Screening Your Child for COVID-19 Symptoms
What to Do If Your Child Does Not Pass Screening
Protocols When Student/Staff Test Positive for COVID-19
Return to School Protocol for Students with COVID-19 Symptoms
Provincial Resources

Guidance documents and resources:

Local School Board Resources

Learn how your local school board is working to support a safe return to class:


Frequently Asked Questions

Should I have my child tested for COVID-19 before they return to school?

Testing your child before returning to school is generally not recommended if they do not have COVID-19 symptoms, unless they have been in close contact with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19.

What if my child shows symptoms before going to school or while at school?

As per the Ministry of Education Guide to Reopening Ontario Schools, all students and staff must self-screen every day using a checklist before arriving at school. If a student or staff member is experiencing any symptoms of COVID-19, they must stay home from school and should seek testing and appropriate medical attention.

If a student or staff member feels sick, or develops symptoms while at school, schools will follow the following protocol:

  • Students or staff who develop COVID-19 symptoms will immediately be separated from others, and the family will be contacted to arrange pick-up.
  • Staff and students with symptoms will be directed to seek medical advice including the recommendation of testing for COVID 19 as appropriate or as advised by their medical provider. Check out local COVID 19 Assessment Centre locations, and book an appointment for COVID- 19 testing.
  • Siblings/staff of ill individual can remain in school until further medical advice is received and should self-monitor for symptoms.
  • Staff and/or students who receive an alternative diagnosis than COVID-19 can return to school once they are symptom-free for 24 hours.

Can I go to work if I don’t have any symptoms but my child is ill and we are waiting on results from their COVID-19 test?

If your child is symptomatic and has been tested for COVID-19, you and your family, including siblings, should self-monitor for signs and symptoms of COVID-19. You can continue to go to school and/or work if you have no symptoms.

  • If while self-monitoring symptoms of COVID-19 develop, self-isolate and be tested for COVID-19 (and no longer attend work and school).
  • If any members of your household test positive for COVID-19, you will be contacted by Public Health directly with more detailed advice.

What if there is a positive case in my child’s school?

If a COVID-19 positive case is identified in a school, staff from the Health Unit will provide further instructions on who else in the school may need testing and/or monitoring/isolation at that time. Staff/children who are being managed by public health (e.g. confirmed cases of COVID-19, household contacts of cases, etc.) must follow the instructions provided by the HKPR District Health Unit on when they can return to school.

What if a parent/guardian tests positive for COVID-19?

Parents/guardians are not required to report their test results to their school, however it is recommended. Members of your household are required to self-isolate and should not attend work or school. If your child is at school, your child should be picked up immediately. Staff from the HKPR District Health Unit will be in contact with you for assessment and provide further direction.

Who will declare an outbreak at the school?

The Heath Unit will declare an outbreak after identifying two or more lab-confirmed COVID-19 cases in students and/or staff (or other visitors) in a school with an epidemiological link where at least one case could have reasonably acquired their infection in the school (including transportation and before/after school care).

Examples of reasonably having acquired infection in school include:

  • No obvious source of infection outside of the school setting; OR
  • Known exposure in the school setting

HKPR District Health Unit staff will work closely with the school to determine close contacts of the case and will provide direction on isolation and facilitate testing.

Are masks now mandatory for all students?

Mandatory masking now applies for all students in Grades 1 to 12. Mask use is also required for before- and after-school programs, as well as on school vehicles. While not required, students in Junior and Senior Kindergarten are also encouraged to wear masks.

Masks must now also be worn outdoors when physical distancing can’t be maintained.


Additional Resources

Click on the following for additional support:


For School Board Staff

Click on the following resources for guidance on safe school reopening during COVID-19:

Protocols for Individuals/Schools With COVID-19
Guidance/Checklists for Reopening Schools
For School Staff
School Nutrition Programs – Guidance and FAQs
For School Bus Drivers/Operators

Changes to Health Unit Services in Schools Due to COVID-19

Due to the pandemic, the following services in schools are being impacted:

  • School-Based Immunization for Grade 7/8 students will not take place this fall due to COVID-19. Normally, the Health Unit provides vaccines for Hep B, HPV and Meningococcal. You can still ensure your Grade 7/8 student is vaccinated for these illnesses, as the Health Unit is offering appointment-based clinics at its offices (with full COVID-19 prevention measures in place). Book your child’s vaccination appointment by calling 1-866-888-4577, ext. 1507.
  • Dental Screening for students in schools has been postponed until further notice. If your child has a toothache or cavity AND you are unable to pay for dental treatment, the Healthy Smiles Ontario (HSO) program may be able to help pay for dental care costs. For help to enroll your child in the HSO program, call the Health Unit at 1-866-888-4577, ext. 1247.
  • Vision Screening for SK students has been cancelled for the 2020/21 school year. It’s recommended you call an optometrist to book a FREE eye examination for your child. To find an optometrist in your area, visit the College of Optometrists of Ontario or call the Health Unit at 1-866-888-4577, ext. 1216.

For Students

Check out these resources to help stay safe at school during the pandemic:

About COVID-19
Washing Hands
Fighting Germs
Wearing Masks
Mental Health Support

COVID-19 Vaccines

Vaccines are now here in the fight against COVID-19. Please read further for more information.


Get Your Vaccine

Video Resources

On This Page:

About COVID-19 Vaccine
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How COVID-19 Vaccines Work

Vaccines have saved millions of lives over the past century. COVID-19 vaccines will work similarly to protect millions more. Here’s how:

  • COVID vaccines work with your body’s natural defenses to build protection against coronavirus.
  • It does this by telling your body to make spike proteins.
  • Spike proteins are unique to the virus that causes COVID-1.9
  • Your immune system responds to the spike proteins by making antibodies that can protect you against COVID-19.

The result is that you build up immunity to the virus, allowing your body to fight off COVID-19 more easily.

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Facts on COVID-19 Vaccine
  • COVID-19 vaccine does not contain the coronavirus and cannot give you COVID-19. Instead, the vaccine offers a dose of protection!
  • Like other vaccines, it may take several days for your body to build full immunity against COVID-19.
  • This means if you come in contact with the virus just before or after you complete the vaccine series, you could still develop COVID-19. That makes it important to continue taking COVID-19 precautions until you are fully protected.
  • The Ontario Medical Association also offers additional facts about COVID-19 vaccine.
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Possible Side-Effects
  • Serious adverse reactions to vaccines are rare.
  • If you get any vaccine, minor side-effects may occur. These are usually mild and clear up within a few days. Some common side-effects include: pain at the site of injection (even redness and swelling), body chills, feeling tired or feeling feverish.
  • Vaccines are constantly monitored for potential reactions and safety measures are put in place if needed. You can be assured COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective!
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What You Can Do
  • Until you are fully vaccinated, continue your efforts to stop the spread of COVID-19:
    • Stay home if sick.
    • Only leave home for essentials like groceries and medical matters.
    • Avoid all non-essential travel.
    • Wear a mask or face covering that covers your nose, mouth and chin when inside public places.
    • Practise physical distancing by staying 2 metres (6 feet) apart from anyone outside your immediate household
    • Wash hands frequently with soap and water.
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Additional Resources

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccine distribution, development and safety:

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Local COVID-19 Testing & Assessment Centres

Download the COVID Alert Tracing App

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COVID-19 Assessment Centres

Below are locations of the specific COVID-19 Assessment Centres in Northumberland County, Haliburton County and the City of Kawartha Lakes. Please note that all COVID-19 Assessment Centres are by appointment only (no walk-ins are allowed). Effective immediately, you are only asked to use these assessment centres if you are:

  • Showing COVID-19 symptoms
  • Have been exposed to a confirmed case of the virus, as informed by your public health unit or exposure notification through the COVID Alert app
  • A resident or work in a setting that has a COVID-19 outbreak, as identified and informed by your local public health unit
  • Eligible for testing as part of a targeted testing initiative directed by the Ministry of Health or the Ministry of Long-Term Care.

Please Note: If you are having difficulty accessing your COVID-19 testing results, please follow up with the Assessment Centre where you were tested.

City of Kawartha Lakes

Ross Memorial Hospital (RMH) COVID-19 Assessment Centre in Lindsay

The RMH COVID-19 Assessment Centre is now located at Ross Memorial Hospital (10 Angeline St. N.) in Lindsay. Testing is by appointment only. To get tested:

  • Visit the Ontario COVID-19 website to see if you qualify for testing under the current provincial guidelines.
  • Call 705-328-6217 to leave a message or request an appointment online.
  • Do not leave multiple messages or submit multiple forms. Someone will get back to you as soon as possible.
  • Appointments are available Monday to Friday from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm

When arriving for your appointment:

  • Arrive at the hospital for your appointment time. (NOTE: When making your appointment, you will be given instructions on where to park and which hospital entrance to use for testing)
  • Wear a mask
  • Bring your health card and identification
  • Maintain physical distancing from others awaiting testing
  • Your results should be available online within five days of testing. If unable to access your results online after five days, call (705) 328-6217 and leave a message.

If symptoms are severe, including difficulty breathing, chest pain, confusion or losing consciousness, you should be seen in the Emergency Department immediately.

Northumberland County

Northumberland Hills Hospital (NHH) COVID-19 Assessment Centre in Cobourg

NHH’s COVID-19 Assessment Centre (1000 DePalma Dr., in Cobourg) is now located in a trailer space immediately outside the hospital’s Emergency Department entrance, A dedicated entry/exit is available to the new assessment centre, directly adjacent to the Emergency Department entrance.

NHH’s COVID-19 Assessment Centre is now operating on an appointment-basis only. Walk-ins will no longer be accepted. To book an appointment, call 905-377-7783. The assessment centre is open daily from 8 am to 4 pm for pre-booked appointments.

The NHH COVID-19 Assessment Centre will screen patients, test (if deemed appropriate) and direct patients to proceed as required. Through a temporary arrangements, the NHH COVID-19 Assessment Centre is now able to offer patients the option to see a primary care provider (family physician or nurse practitioner) in addition to receiving a COVID-19 test.  Learn more details by calling the centre.

Trent Hills COVID-19 Assessment https://cmh.ca/document-library/news-updates/743-trent-hills-covid-assessment-centre-reducing-hours/fileCentre in Campbellford

As of July 26, the centre is open on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm. To book an appointment for COVID-19 test, call the local Assessment Centre directly at 705-395-1801. Please do not go to the Assessment Centre without first calling to book an appointment. Please do not call Campbellford Memorial Hospital either.

The Trent Hills COVID 19 Assessment Centre is located at Campbellford Memorial Hospital (146 Oliver Rd., in Campbellford) on the basement level in the former paramedic bay and offices. Access to the site is through a drive-up centre. All visitors are to remain in their cars, and Assessment Centre staff will provide assessment/testing to you while you remain in your vehicle.

Haliburton County

Haliburton County COVID-19 Community Assessment Centre

To book an appointment for testing, call the Haliburton County COVID-19 Community Assessment Centre at 705-457-1212 (press 6) during regular business hours. You can seek an appointment if you are a Haliburton County resident and meet any of the following criteria:

  • You have at least one COVID-19 symptom.
  • You have been exposed to a confirmed COVID-19 case, as informed by your public health unit or exposure notification through the COVID Alert app.
  • You are a resident or worker in a setting that has a COVID-19 outbreak, as identified and informed by your local public health unit.
  • You are eligible for testing as part of a targeted testing initiative directed by the Ministry of Health or Ministry of Long-Term Care.

PLEASE NOTE: if your symptoms are severe, call 9-1-1 and alert the dispatcher to your symptoms.

The Haliburton County COVID-19 Community Assessment Centre is staffed by health care providers who will complete a phone assessment and advise as to appropriate next steps. This may include self-monitoring instructions, self-isolation instructions, or further assessment and testing in the drive-through facility. The Centre is for all residents of Haliburton County, regardless of whether you have a family doctor. While the clinic is for residents of Haliburton County, no Ontarian who is symptomatic or has been exposed to COVID-19 will be declined a test at the Assessment Centre.

COVID-19 Testing at Pharmacies

The Ontario government is now allowing select pharmacies to provide COVID-19 testing, including some in the local Health Unit area. Testing at pharmacies will be free, by appointment, and available ONLY to people who are not showing COVID-19 symptoms. Pharmacies will also be doing COVID pre-screening of anyone seeking a test. Click here to find pharmacy testing locations in your area (you can search by community or postal code).

Beach Safety During COVID-19

Enjoy the water, sand and nice weather by heading to the beach this summer. But during COVID-19, please continue taking precautions to protect yourself from the virus.


On This Page:

Do Not Come if You Are Sick:
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Before Visiting the Beach:
  • Visit a beach close to your home. Traveling long distances to visit a beach may contribute to the spread of COVID-19.
  • Check with your local municipality to see if the beach has opened for the season or what restrictions/closures may be place due to COVID-19.
  • Check the Health Unit’s latest beach water test results in Haliburton County, Northumberland County and the City of Kawartha Lakes to see if the water is safe for swimming. You can also call the Health Unit at 1-866-888-4577, ext. 5006.
  • Have a back-up plan. If the beach is too crowded and you can’t safely practise physical distancing by staying 2 metres (6 feet) away from others, consider another fun activity to do instead.
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What to Bring to the Beach:
  • Hand sanitizer and disinfecting wipes (stored in a cool dry place). Use these, especially if soap and water are unavailable
  • Items to help you keep your distance from others on the beach and in the water. For parents, tents, umbrellas and blankets can be good visual reminders for children. You can also put physical distancing into ‘fun’ terms for kids… like staying one hoola-hoop apart, three geese apart or six beach balls apart.
  • Sunscreen and sun protection (with SPF 30+)
  • Patience, especially if you need to wait to access the beach and other facilities.
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Additional Considerations:
  • Hand Hygiene and Respiratory Etiquette
    • Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom, before eating, and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing
    • Use hand sanitizer when soap and water aren’t available
  • Cleaning and Disinfecting
    • Clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces such as picnic tables before and after use
    • Use handwashing facilities in washrooms and/or portable toilets. Beach/park staff should also be cleaning bathroom facilities hourly and deep-cleaning and disinfecting them  periodically through the day.
    • If desired, use hand sanitizer after accessing washrooms as an extra preventive step
  • Use of Face Coverings (Non-Medical Masks)
    • Wear a mask if physical distancing is not possible
    • DO NOT wear a face covering in the water as it can make it hard to breathe
  • Keep Your Distance From Others
    • Practise physical distancing by staying 2 metres (6 feet) from others on the beach, in the water and in public washrooms. Think of the distance as the length of a pool noodle.
    • Carefully choose a spot on the beach that leaves enough space for you to stay a safe distance from others. Maintain at least 4 metres (12 feet) between blanketed areas
    • Avoid crowded areas and do not gather with others outside of your family/household
  • Avoid Large Gatherings
    • Follow signs and listen to municipal staff/lifeguards who may be there to direct, assist and remind about distancing.
    • Do NOT take part in organized activities like beach volleyball, frisbee, football, etc.
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When You Arrive at the Beach:
  • Review all signs before entering the beach/park
  • Give other beach-goers time and space to safely enter or exit vehicles
  • Know what to expect at the beach:
    • Parking attendants may be stationed at some locations
    • Access to beach may be different. For example, walkways may be single file to enter/exit the beach. Standing in walkways may not be permitted to allow for foot traffic. A limit on the number of people allowed on the beach may also be in effect.
    • Parking capacity may be reduced to limit the number of people on the beach at once
    • You may have to stand in line for washrooms, as the number of people allowed inside is limited to allow for physical distancing
  • When swimming, avoid swallowing water, spitting or spouting
  • Take your garbage and recyclables home for safe disposal, especially mask and gloves
  • Be safe in the water, especially keeping a close eye on children and new swimmers.
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Reopening Businesses and Services – Step Three

Current Situation
  • As of Friday, July 16, Ontario will enter Step Three of its reopening plan. It is expected to remain in this phase for approximately 21 days.
  • Step Three rules will apply to Haliburton County, Northumberland County and the City of Kawartha Lakes.
  • In general, Step Three will allow more indoor activities to resume, including eating inside restaurants and working/exercising in gyms/fitness clubs. Larger indoor and outdoor gatherings will be allowed, and capacity limits for businesses and stores will be eased. Physical distancing rules will still apply and masks/face coverings must continue to be worn inside public places.
  • For complete details on what is and isn’t allowed in Step Three, click here for Ontario Regulation 520/21 Rules for Areas in Stage Three.

On This Page

Highlights – Step Three
  • Larger social gatherings are allowed. Up to 25 people can gather indoors, while up to 100 people can gather outdoors.
  • Gyms/fitness clubs can reopen for indoor use, but at 50% capacity
  • Restaurants can provide in-person dining inside their premises
  • Movie theatres can reopen, at 50% capacity indoors or a maximum of 1,000 people (whichever is less)
  • More people are allowed inside businesses and stores. Capacity is limited to the number of people who can maintain 2 metres physical distance.
  • Larger indoor religious services (including weddings and funerals) are allowed, but capacity is limited to the number of people who can maintain 2 metres physical distance.
  • Masks/face coverings must continue to be worn inside public places, unless exempted. Masks need to cover a person’s mouth, nose and chin
  • Personal care services that require the removal of a face covering can now resume.  
  • More people are allowed to visit museums, galleries, historic sites, aquariums, zoos, landmarks, botanical gardens, science centres, casinos/bingo halls, amusement parks, fairs and rural exhibitions, and festivals. Indoor capacity cannot exceed 50%, while outdoor capacity is at 75%. 
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Specific Rules – Step Three

Read on for more details on Stage Three rules.

Indoor and Outdoor Gatherings
  • Up to 25 people are now allowed at indoor social gatherings and organized public events.
  • A maximum of 100 people is permitted for outdoor social gatherings and organized public events.
  • Retirement homes are exempt from gathering limits.
  • Stay home if sick. Do not attend any gatherings. Click here for additional advice about gathering for holidays and celebrations.
  • Masks must be worn at organized indoor public events. Physical distancing (staying 2 metres apart from others outside your household) is also required at organized indoor public events.
  • While Step Three does not require masks to be worn at social gatherings inside private homes, face coverings are required in common areas (hallways) in multi-unit dwellings like apartments, condominiums, etc. . Wearing a mask indoors regardless of where you are can reduce the spread of COVID-19.
  • Ensure you are fully vaccinated against COVID-19. Ask others attending the gathering what their vaccination status is, so you can take appropriate precautions such as wearing a mask and staying two metres apart from others outside your household.
  • To reduce your risk of COVID-19, continue to practise physical distancing at any gathering you attend.
  • COVID-19 is less likely to be spread outdoors than in, so consider meeting others outdoors. If meeting inside, open windows and doors to allow for good ventilation.
  • Continue to stop the spread of COVID-19. Click here additional COVID-19 prevention measures.
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Religious Services, Weddings and Funerals
  • Indoor and outdoor weddings, funerals and religious services are allowed.
  • Capacity at these services is limited to the number of people who can distance at least two metres.
  • Whether indoors or outdoors, attendees must stay 2 metres apart from each other, except if they live in the same household
  • Masks/face coverings must be worn inside when you are within 2 metres of another person who is not part of their household. Mask use is also recommended outdoors if you cannot stay 2 metres apart from someone outside your household
  • Drive-in services, rites or ceremonies can still be offered
  • Consider livestreaming services for those who are unable or do not feel comfortable attending in-person
  • Receptions are permitted, with up to 25 people indoors and a maximum of 100 people outdoors
  • Click here for more information on COVID-19 prevention measures at places of worship.
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Businesses and Services
  • Get full details on restrictions for businesses by clicking here.
  • All businesses must have a COVID-19 safety plan in place that is also posted in a visible location for people to see. Click here for a sample.
  • Businesses must ensure anyone entering their premise wears a mask/face covering properly (unless exempted) and stays two metres apart from others
  • Cleaning and disinfecting of the business premise should be done as frequently as needed to maintain sanitary conditions.
  • More people are allowed inside essential and non-essential businesses, stores and malls (although loitering in malls is not allowed). Capacity is limited to the number of people who can maintain 2 metres physical distance. The maximum number of customers must be posted in a visible location. For a handy resource to help you figure out store capacity limits, use the Retail Council of Canada’s Store Capacity Calculator.
  • Restaurants and bars can now offer indoor dining and buffet meals, as well as outdoor patio dining. There is no limit on the number of people seated per table. Capacity inside and outside the restaurant/bar is limited to the number of people who can maintain 2 metres physical distance. Tables must be spaced at least 2 metres apart or have a barrier separating them. Restaurants must record the name and contact information of every customer who dines in.
  • Indoor food or drink establishments where dance facilities are provided, including nightclubs and ‘restobars’, can open up to 25% capacity or a maximum of 250 people (whichever is less).
  • All businesses must ensure physical distancing is in place for any customers lined up outdoors. Lineups inside are not allowed, unless the business ensures customers wear a mask and stay at least 2 metres apart from each other.
  • All staff/employees must be screened for COVID-19 prior to entry. Consider using the online Employee screening tool.
  • Signs must be posted in a prominent location, informing customers/patrons to screen themselves for COVID-19 before entering. , or the one designed for customers.
  • All personal care services (like hair salons and barbershops) are open, including those that require the removal of a face covering. Click here for full details
  • Gyms and fitness clubs can reopen for indoor use, but at 50% capacity and with other restrictions in place. This includes maintaining 2 metres physical distance between patrons. Signs must be posted in a visible location showing the capacity limit. Gyms and fitness clubs must record the name and contact information of every customer who enters the facility for the purpose of COVID-19 contact tracing.
  • For sports and recreational facilities, capacity for indoor spectators is 50% of the usual seating capacity, or 1,000 people (whichever is less). Other restrictions are also in place.
  • Indoor meeting and event spaces can reopen, with physical distancing and other restrictions in place. Maximum capacity is 50% of the total indoor space, or up to 1,000 people (whichever is less)
  • Real estate open houses are allowed, with capacity limited to the number of people that can maintain 2 metres physical distance.
  • Driver instruction can resume. All students must be actively screened for COVID-19. Both instructors and students must wear a mask when in the vehicle.  
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Personal Care Services
  • Personal care services, including those provided by hair salons and barbershops, manicure and pedicure salons, aesthetician services, piercing services, tanning salons, spas and tattoo studios, can reopen if they comply with certain conditions.
  • Services that require the removal of a face covering are now allowed to resume.
  • Oxygen bars remain closed.
  • Persons who provide personal care services in the business must wear appropriate personal protective equipment (medical masks that cover nose, mouth and chin; goggles that provide eye protection).
  • Appointments are required. No walk-ins are allowed.
  • Employees and customers must be actively screened for COVID-19 before they enter the premises. Use the online employee screening tool and the web-based version for customers.
  • The total number of customers allowed to be inside the business is limited to the number that can maintain 2 metres physical distance.
  • A sign must be posted in a prominent location in the business that states the capacity limit.
  • All personal care settings must have a COVID-19 safety plan in place that is also posted in a visible location for people to see. Click here for a sample.
  • Any music played inside the business must be set at a level that allows for a normal conversation to take place.
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Attractions
  • Museums, galleries, historic sites, aquariums, zoos, landmarks, botanical gardens, science centres, casinos/bingo halls, amusement parks, water parks, fairs and rural exhibitions and festivals can resume operation. Capacity is limited to 50% indoors and 75% outdoors.
  • Concert venues, cinemas, and movie theatres can operate at up to 50% capacity indoors or a maximum limit of 1,000 people for seated events (whichever is less). For outdoor use, maximum capacity is set at 75% or up to 5,000 people for unseated events (whichever is less). For outdoor events with fixed seating, maximum capacity is 75% or up to 15,000 people (whichever is less), with additional restrictions.
  • Casinos, bingo halls and gaming establishments can reopen at 50% capacity. Additional restrictions are also in place.
  • Outdoor horse racing tracks and motor speedways can reopen with restrictions. For unseated events, up to 75% capacity or 5,000 people (whichever is less) is allowed. For events with fixed seating, up to 75% capacity or 15,000 people (whichever is less) is permitted. Other restrictions must also be in place. For similar indoor venues, capacity is limited to 50% or 1,000 people, whichever is less.
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Activities and Amenities
  • Outdoor amenities like golf courses, tennis courts, skateboarding parks, sports fields, and basketball courts remain open with restrictions. Horse riding is also permitted, with restrictions. Anyone using these amenities must stay two metres apart from anyone outside their household.
  • Indoor pools are allowed to reopen at 50% capacity, and with other restrictions in place. Outdoor pools, splash pads, spray pads, whirlpools, wading pools and water slides remain open, but with capacity limited to permit physical distancing of 2 metres.
  • Short-term rentals such as cottages, cabins, and resorts remain open. Along with outdoor pools, indoor pools, communal steam rooms, saunas/whirlpools and indoor fitness centres/recreational facilities at these sites are also allowed to reopen with restrictions.
  • Seasonal trailer parks can operate as usual, with no limit on how long you can stay there. Outdoor gatherings are limited to 100 people, while indoor gatherings are limited to 25 people. Outdoor pools can open (but must first be inspected by a Public Health Inspector with the Health Unit).
  • Hotels, motels and shared rental accommodations remain open. Amenities like indoor pools, communal steam rooms, saunas/whirlpools and indoor fitness centres/recreational facilities at these sites are also allowed to reopen with restrictions
  • Marinas can be open, including most indoor amenities. Some restrictions remain in place.
  • Overnight camping at campgrounds and campsites (including Ontario Parks) continues to be allowed, with restrictions.
  • Community centres and multi-purpose facilities can reopen with restrictions
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Day and Overnight Camps
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Garage/Yard Sales

Garage and yard sales are allowed, but with the following COVID-19 restrictions in place: 

  • Up to 100 people are allowed for outdoor sales at one time 
  • People should keep 2 metres apart from anyone outside their household
  • It’s best to display sale items outdoors, not inside garages or other enclosed structures, as the risk of spreading COVID-19 outdoors is lower. If you decide to display items inside, no more than 25 people are allowed inside at one time (physical distancing must be maintained) 
  • Provide alcohol-based hand sanitizer and recommend its use 
  • Masks must be worn inside for any sales (except if all members of the same household) and are recommended outdoors if people cannot maintain 2 metres (6 feet) physical distance from anyone outside their household
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About Ontario’s Three-Step Roadmap to Reopen

Ontario’s three-step reopening plan is based on overall COVID-19 vaccination rates in Ontario and other key health indicators (such as COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations, ICU occupancy and new admissions). Click here to learn more about the Roadmap to Reopen.

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Additional Resources:

Click on the following links for additional support:

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Reducing Harm When Using Drugs

Do you use substances or other drugs? Reduce your risk of harm to avoid overdoses and infections. Read on for more information.


On This Page:

Safety Tips if Using Drugs:
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Extra Precautions During COVID-19
  • If you are feeling sick, do not leave home. Ask a buddy to pick up supplies including naloxone from harm reduction sites or outreach workers. Arrange to have the supplies dropped off at your door, being sure to practise physical distancing 
  • Do not share supplies (cigarettes, joints, pipes, injecting equipment, containers for alcohol, utensils, and other supplies). Use your own mouthpiece and keep it only for YOUR use
  • Avoid handshakes, hugs, kisses, and other close contact
  • Wash your hands with soap and water or use hand sanitizer before preparing, handling, or using drugs. Prepare your own drugs
  • If you cannot wash your hands with soap or use hand sanitizer, use alcohol-based hand wipes
  • Cough or sneeze into your elbow or use tissues. Throw tissues away immediately and wash your hands
  • It’s strongly recommended you clean surfaces with soap and water, alcohol wipes, bleach, or hydrogen peroxide before preparing drugs
  • If you share a washroom with others, clean and disinfect surfaces like knobs, taps, and flushers. Use soap and water, bleach, hydrogen peroxide or alcohol-based wipes (70%) after every use. Do not mix different types of cleaning solutions
  • Buddy up if using drugs, but be safe! COVID-19 is passed by droplets, so you must stay 2 metres (six feet) – roughly the length of a hockey stick – from your buddy to avoid passing the virus
  • Using with a buddy is safer than using drugs alone, but remember to keep your physical distance! Buddies may be able to bring food, harm reduction supplies, medicine, and substances so that you can stay well. You can also be a buddy to others who need support. Check in on your buddies regularly and have them do the same for you
  • Carry naloxone and have an overdose plan. If necessary, you can perform chest compressions. Do not do rescue breathing due to COVID-19 concerns
  • If you must use drugs by yourself, call a buddy to have him/her regularly check in on you.
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What to Do if You See or Experience a Drug Overdose
  • If you see someone overdosing, call 9-1-1 and give the person naloxone.
  • The Good Samaritan Act offers legal protection for someone to help in an emergency. The Good Samaritan Drug Overdose Act protects anyone on scene of an overdose from being charged for possessing/using drugs

If using a naloxone kit, refer to the Five Steps to Respond to an Opioid Overdose sheet. Take these extra precautions too:

  • Stimulate: try and rouse the person, encourage them to take breaths
  • If no response: call 9-1-1, give naloxone and perform chest compressions. DO NOT try doing rescue breathing
  • When using a naloxone kit: put gloves on, but do not use the face shield/breathing barrier for rescue breaths (not advised given COVID-19 situation)
  • After responding, properly remove gloves and throw them in the garbage. Wash/clean hands thoroughly
  • If chest compressions are needed, place a towel or a piece of clothing over the person’s nose and mouth to protect yourself from droplets.
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Why Harm Reduction Works
  • Harm reduction is a term that applies to any program, service or action that reduces the risk of injury and illness. If you have applied sunscreen or buckled up a seatbelt, you’ve embraced harm reduction.
  • When it comes to substance use, harm reduction provides strategies and ideas to reduce the consequences of drug use and other health risks. Harm reduction meets people where they’re at in their substance use and provides programs and services to help them enhance their skills and knowledge to live safer and healthier lives.
  • Harm reduction works! Learn more.
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Additional Resources
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Community Gardens and COVID-19

  • NEW: As of 12:01 am on Friday, July 16, Ontario will move into Step Three of its reopening plan with fewer restrictions in place. Click here for details.

Planning to operate or take part in a community garden this growing season?

The Health Unit is offering these recommendations to those involved in community gardens in Haliburton County, Northumberland County and the City of Kawartha Lakes to protect the health and safety of everyone during COVID-19. Below are the minimum standards that all community gardens must have in place before opening. 

Use these standards as a starting point to begin planning and developing specific COVID-19 policies and protocols for your community garden. Be sure to communicate these plans to all garden members.


On This Page:


Entrance Restrictions/Requirements
  • Members of the public are not allowed into the gardens. Only garden members are allowed. Post these printable signs in your garden as reminders:
  • Anyone attending the garden should first complete the online COVID-19 Self-Assessment Tool and follow its recommendations.
  • Garden members MUST NOT visit the garden if they show symptoms of COVID-19 or have been in contact with someone with COVID-19
  • Post signs around the garden on COVID-19 symptoms, physical distancing, and handwashing. Policies and protocols relating to COVID-19 should also be put up at all entrances and throughout the garden
  • Use a ‘sign-in and sign-out system’ to track who is in the garden each day 
  • Update the list of current registered members, staff and volunteers involved in the community garden. Track those who have agreed to participate under COVID-19 policies and protocols.

Physical Distancing
  • Only allow the number of people that can maintain 2 metres at all times (to a maximum of 100 people) to work in the community garden at once. To do this, consider developing a schedule where plots are numbered, and odd/even numbered plots come on different days.
  • Maintain physical distancing when two or more gardeners are present. Keep at least two metres (six feet) apart from others
  • If people plan to wear masks/face coverings in the garden, follow this Public Health Ontario fact sheet on how to properly wear and throw away mask.
  • Remember wearing rubber gloves out in public does not reduce the risk of COVID-19. Handwashing with soap/water or hand sanitizer and not touching your face offer more protection 
  • If gardeners choose to wear mask and rubber gloves, wash hands before putting on the mask/gloves and after taking them off
  • Masks and rubber gloves must be disposed of in a lined garbage bin only.

Hand Hygiene/Handwashing
  • Provide handwashing or alcohol-based hand sanitizer (with 60 to 90% alcohol content) stations
  • Encourage all gardeners to regularly wash/sanitize hands, especially before entering and after leaving the garden  
  • Gardeners should know that if their hands are visibly soiled, they must first wash them with soap and water or wipe them before applying alcohol-based hand sanitizer

Garden Equipment and Tools – Use and Cleaning Requirements
  • Ask garden members to bring their own tools, or assign select tools and tasks to individuals or smaller groups
  • Avoid sharing garden gloves. Gardeners should take their gloves home to wash after each use 
  • Use gardening techniques that reduce the need for frequent trips to the garden (For example: use mulch to reduce the need for watering/weeding, row covers to prevent pests, etc.)
  • Create and implement procedures to clean and disinfect all shared tools before and after garden work
  • Regularly clean gardening tools with soap and water to remove organic matter. First rinse off soap with water, then disinfect. Consider disinfecting the handles of any tools that are shared. Use either a mixture of 1 Tbsp. of household (5%) bleach and 1 litre of warm water (mix a fresh batch each day) with 10 minutes contact time OR commercial Lysol or Clorox disinfectant with contact time indicated on label for disinfecting
  • Ensure regular cleaning and disinfecting of high-touch indoor surfaces such as doorknobs, padlocks, water spigots, gates handle, railings etc.
  • When bringing home garden produce, wash any vegetables and fruit under clean running water (not soapy water) before eating 

There is no need to contact the Health Unit prior to opening your community garden. But if you are an organizer, you must ensure that all participants are aware of the regulatory requirements and public health measures that must be followed to stop the spread of COVID-19.


Additional Resources

Mental Health and COVID-19

  • NEW: As of 12:01 am on Friday, July 16, Ontario will move into Step Three of its reopening plan with fewer restrictions in place. Click here for details.

COVID-19 can feel overwhelming. While it’s important to reduce the risk of the virus, you also need to look after your mental health at this time. Here’s what to do: 

  • Maintain routines as you’re able, keeping in mind the importance to take precautions such as physical distancing to slow the spread of COVID-19.
  • Earn peace of mind by getting both doses of COVID-19 vaccine, to ensure you are fully protected against the virus.
  • Seek professional help. If you’re overwhelmed, talk by phone to a health professional or counsellor. If you have coverage for a counsellor through work, access your Employee and Family Assistance Plan.  
  • Eat well 
  • Stay active: Doing fun and healthy activities outdoors makes it easier to keep physical distance.  
  • Get enough sleep 
  • Look back at challenging situations and see how you successfully coped with them 
  • Limit your daily dose of COVID-19-related news to reduce anxiety and worry. Fight fear with facts about the pandemic by turning to credible sources of information. 

Supporting Others 

  • COVID-19 affects everyone, so be kind to others – regardless of gender, ethnicity, income or age. 
  • Reduce stigma. Use supportive language like: “people who have COVID-19”, “people who are being treated for COVID19”, or “people who are recovering from COVID-19”. Don’t define others  just because they’re affected by the coronavirus.   
  • Be neighbourly and assist others where possible, being sure to protect your health as well. 
  • Share positive and inspiring stories of what your community is doing to pull together during this time.  
  • Be patient and recognize the role caretakers and health care workers are playing in supporting people affected with COVID-19.  
If You Are Self-Isolating 
  • Stay connected with friends and family by phone, social media or video calls. 
  • Ask for help from friends, family and neighbours to deliver necessities to your door. Many community groups (e.g. churches and service clubs) have volunteers to help those who are isolated. 
  • Even if isolating or in quarantine, keep up your personal daily routines at home or create new ones.  
  • Stay healthy. Be active, eat well and get enough sleep.  
If You Have Mental Health and Addiction Issues

It’s extra important to control your anxiety and maintain your mental wellness during COVID-19:

  • Consider and accept that some fear and anxiety is normal
  • Seek credible information provided by experts and reputable sources
  • Assess your personal risk
  • Seek support
  • Get proper rest and sleep
  • Stay active
  • Access this Mental Health and COVID-19 Pandemic resource from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH).
Additional Resources:  

Four County Crisis – If you’re in crisis please call 705-745-6484 or toll-free 1-866-995-9933. By phoning these numbers, you can access 24-hour, free, confidential crisis support.

211 Community Support – Easily find/search government and community-based services during COVID-19.  Call or text 2-1-1 day or night to find support for all of life’s challenges. Live Chat also available Monday to Friday from 7 am to 9 pm.

Centre for Addition and Mental Health  

Bounce Back – A guided self-help program for adults and youth aged 15 and over using workbooks with online videos and phone coaching support.

Guidance for Mental Health Resources for Camp Operators and Staff (Ontario Ministry of Health) provides a list of resources on how to talk to children and youth about the COVID-19 pandemic and seek mental health supports.

Kids’ Help Phone – 24/7 virtual support service offering professional counselling, information and referrals as well as volunteer-led, text-based support to young people. Services available in both English and French by calling 1-800-668-6868.

Good2Talk – Free, confidential mental health support service providing professional counselling and information and referrals for mental health, addictions and well-being to postsecondary students in Ontario

Wellness Together Canada – Mental health and substance use support.

World Health Organization 

Download and print resources below:

COVID-19

Access local COVID-19 data, and information to reduce your risk of COVID-19.

Scroll down this page for resources and links on how to stay safe and protect yourself and others from COVID-19. If you need further help or guidance, call the Health Unit at 1-866-888-4577, ext. 5020, or email info@hkpr.on.ca.

  • As of 12:01 am on Friday, July 16, Ontario will move into Step Three of its reopening plan with fewer restrictions in place. Click here for details.

Cases of COVID-19 within the HKPR District area
  • Updated Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays (excluding holidays).

Local COVID-19 Vaccinations to Date

Self-Isolation During COVID-19 – Class Order Under Section 22 (5.01.1) of the Health Protection and Promotion Act 

Weekly COVID-19 Community Updates – YouTube

Additional COVID-19 Data Links

Current COVID-19 Travel Restrictions and Quarantine Rules – Gov’t of Canada

Featured Items

COVID-19 Content

Physical Distancing

Practise physical distancing as much as possible anytime you’re outdoors or in the community. This is important to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Current Situation
  • NOTE: As of 12:01 am on Friday (July 16), Ontario will move into Step Three of its reopening plan, which means larger indoor/outdoor gatherings will be allowed, more businesses and services can reopen/resume, and additional restrictions are being lifted.
  • Under Step Three, up to 100 people will be allowed at outdoor gatherings and organized public events. Be sure to maintain 2 metres physical distance from anyone you do not live with. You must wear a mask if you are within 2 metres of a person who is not part of your household.
  • Under Step Three, small indoor gatherings of up to 25 people will be allowed (including those from different households). Masks should be worn.
Tips for Physical Distancing:
  • Keep a minimum two-metre (six-foot) distance between yourself and others. That’s roughly the length of a hockey stick or a pool noodle.
  • When out in the community, practise physical distancing every step of the way!
  • Wear masks inside all public places. Consider mask use outdoors too, when unable to maintain physical distance from those outside your household.
  • Get outside to exercise and be active, but try to maintain a physical distance of at last 2 metres (6-feet) from others.
  • Get both doses of your COVID-19 vaccine when eligible.
  • Greet people with a wave, bow or nod, instead of handshake or hug. After being outside, wash your hands with soap and water.
  • Work from home if possible. Talk to your supervisor, manager, or employer about options. Cancel in-person business meetings. Instead, look at teleconferencing or video chat options.
  • If you are sick, stay home and use Ontario’s online COVID-19 Screening Tool to see what additional care you may need.
  • Sanitize/wash your hands when entering or exiting building. Avoid long lineups. Use tap to pay instead of handling money.
  • Do NOT use public transit if you are sick. Self-isolate at home right away.
  • If you must use public transit, wash hands often, keep a two-metre distance between other passengers, wear a non-medical mask and aim to travel in non-peak hours.

Remember: While you may not feel sick, and while these measures may seem inconvenient, they are important to reduce the spread of COVID-19.


Additional Resources:

Download and print resources below:

Places of Worship during COVID-19

On This Page:


Current Situation

NOTE: As of 12:01 am on Friday (July 16), Ontario will move into Step Three of its reopening plan. For places of worship, the move to Step Three means larger gathering limits for indoor religious services, weddings and funerals. Here are the key points under Step Three:

  • Indoor and outdoor weddings, funerals and religious services are allowed.
  • Capacity at these services is limited to the number of people who can distance at least two metres.
  • Whether indoors or outdoors, attendees must stay 2 metres apart from each other, except if they live in the same household
  • Masks/face coverings must be worn inside when you are within 2 metres of another person who is not part of their household. Mask use is also recommended outdoors if you cannot stay 2 metres apart from someone outside your household
  • Drive-in services, rites or ceremonies can still be offered
  • Consider livestreaming services for those who are unable or do not feel comfortable attending in-person
  • Receptions are permitted, with up to 25 people indoors and a maximum of 100 people outdoors

Read on for additional ways to protect the health and safety of your members and congregants by taking measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19.


COVID-19 Vaccination
  • Encourage members to get both doses of their COVID-19 vaccines, so they are fully protected against the virus.
  • Consider helping members arrange a vaccination, especially if they find it challenging or difficult to navigate their way to get a dose. Click here for COVID-19 vaccination clinic information in the area.

Use of Non-Medical Masks Face Coverings During Religious Services

Everyone must wear a mask at all times when indoors attending a place of worship. The only exceptions are anyone who:

  • Is younger than two years of age;
  • Has a medical condition that inhibits their ability to wear a mask or face covering
  • Is unable to put on or remove a mask or face covering without help from another person.
  • Needs to temporarily remove their mask or face covering while in the indoor area, as it may be necessary for the purposes of health and safety.
  • Is being reasonably accommodated in accordance with the Human Rights Code or the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (2005).
  • Performs work for the business or organization, is in an area that is not accessible to members of the public, and is able to maintain a physical distance of at least two metres (6 feet) from every other person while in the indoor area.

This last point may allow priests, ministers or other worship leaders to remove their mask during the mass (or service) when preaching to the congregation from a lectern or pulpit, so long as the area is separated by at least four metres from other people.

The priest, minister or worship leader must wear a mask when greeting people as they come in or leave the place of worship, and during communion.

A place of worship should consult with its local police service or municipal bylaw enforcement, as they may have a different interpretation and require a priest, minister or worship leader to wear a mask at all times.


Weddings and Funerals

As of July 16, the following measures apply to weddings and funerals:

  • Indoor and outdoor weddings, funerals and religious services are allowed.
  • Capacity at these services is limited to the number of people who can distance at least two metres.
  • Receptions are permitted, with up to 25 people indoors and a maximum of 100 people outdoors.
  • Mask use and physical distancing rules apply.
  • Drive-in services, rites or ceremonies are permitted, with certain conditions
  • Virtual services are allowed

General COVID-19 Preventive Tips for Places of Worship
  • Encourage everyone to get their COVID-19 vaccine.
  • Maintain physical distancing by staying two metres (six feet) apart at all times.
  • Anyone who is feeling sick must stay home and not attend a service.
  • Encourage everyone to wash their hands. Ensure hand-cleaning stations and alcohol-based sanitizer dispensers are available at entrances to your place of worship. 
  • Ensure everyone wears a mask or face covering at all times, including when seated during the worship service.
  • Do NOT shake hands or hug.  
  • Remind people to cough/sneeze into their sleeves. 
  • Discourage group singing. Use audio or video recordings instead.
  • Review the sharing of items during special religious sacraments/rites, at least while COVID-19 continues to circulate. You may want to consult further with your parish/diocese/denomination/national body. 
  • Maintain a clean and safe space through regular cleaning and disinfecting. High-touch surfaces should be cleaned twice a day or following each service (whichever is more frequent).
  • Have a traffic flow plan in place, such as one-way enter/one-way exit.
  • Encourage members/parishioners who are more vulnerable to COVID-19 (including those over age 70 and people with compromised immune systems) to take part in virtual services or hold a dedicated service solely for this group.
  • Consider keeping a record of all attendees for contact tracing in case of a COVID-19 outbreak.

Stay Connected to Members/Congregants in Other Ways
  • Continue to offer virtual or live-streamed services, especially for people who may still feel uncomfortable attending a service in-person.
  • Keep in touch by phone or via social media/email/text. Share credible information – like what’s on this website on how people can protect themselves from COVID-19. 

Additional Resources:

Download and print resources below:

Emergency Orders, Directives and Closures

To prevent the spread of COVID-19, different levels of government have put in place the following directives, orders and closures. Please read on for further details.

On This Page:

HKPR District Health Unit

Provincial Orders
  • As of 12:01 am on Friday (July 16), Ontario will move into Step Three of its reopening plan, which means the size of indoor and outdoor gatherings increases, more businesses and services can reopen/resume and additional restrictions are being lifted.
  • Anyone 12 years of age and older is now eligible to receive COVID-19 vaccines. Click here for the latest information on where and how to get COVID-19 vaccination in Haliburton County, Northumberland County and the City of Kawartha Lakes.

Federal Orders 
  • The federal government has updated its travel restrictions during COVID-19, including for COVID-19 testing and quarantine requirements. There is also new travel guidance for fully-vaccinated Canadians. Click here for the latest updates.
  • The Public Health Agency of Canada has released new guidance what fully- and partially-vaccinated individuals can and can’t do. Click on Vaccinated Against COVID-19… What it Means to Me for more information. 
  • The federal government has also helped create the new online My COVID-19 Visit Risk calculator to provide people with guidance on planning safe visits or gatherings with other people.

Mask Use during COVID-19

On This Page:

Wearing masks/face coverings is an important way to reduce the risk of COVID-19. That’s why it’s important to know when and how to properly wear a mask.

NOTE: The Ontario government is mandating the use of face coverings in all public indoor settings across the province, such as businesses, facilities and workplaces, with limited exemptions. For complete details, click here.

The Province now recommends wearing a mask or face covering outdoors when you can’t maintain 2 metres physical distance from others outside your household. 

Medical Masks (like surgical and N-95):
close up White protective hygenic mask isolated backgrounds for doctors and patient from virus biological infection and PM2.5 dust, pandemic news

These must be kept for health care providers and for those providing direct care for someone with COVID-19.

If you’re experiencing COVID-19 symptoms and need to seek medical care, wear a mask. Your health provider may also recommend you wear a mask while you’re seeking or waiting for care. The mask acts as a barrier and helps stop the tiny droplets from spreading around you when you cough or sneeze.

Masks MUST be put on, taken off and thrown out properly. If you need to wear a mask, be sure to clean your hands frequently with soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer. When wearing a mask, follow this Public Health Ontario fact sheet  on how to properly wear and throw away one.


Homemade (Cloth) Masks:

The Ontario government is now mandating that masks have to be worn in all indoor public places across the province (with some exceptions).

When worn properly, non-medical masks can help to cover your mouth and nose to prevent your respiratory droplets from contaminating other people or landing on common surfaces. The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) advises that putting on a homemade mask can help protect others around you if you’re ill with COVID-19 and do not yet know it. PHAC is also recommending that masks or face coverings should be made of at least three layers, including:

  • Two layers made of tightly woven material fabric, such as cotton and
  • A third (middle) layer made of a filter-type fabric, such as non-woven polypropylene.

NOTE: People shouldn’t throw away their two-layer non-medical masks. If making or buying more masks, consider the three-layer mask for improved protection.

Wearing a face mask in public places, together with washing your hands with soap and water, staying home and maintaining physical distancing, are all important to help prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Homemade masks or facial coverings should not be worn/put on by:

  • Children under age 2 years, or a child under the age of five years either chronologically or developmentally
  • A person who is unable to remove a mask without assistance
  • Anyone who cannot safely wear a non-medical mask or face covering due to medical reasons such as, but not limited to, respiratory disease, cognitive difficulties or difficulties in hearing or processing information

Click here for specific information on mask use regulations currently in effect in Ontario.


Double Masking

Double-masking means wearing one face mask on top of another. An example is wearing a disposable mask underneath a cloth mask.

In early February 2021, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released new research that found wearing a cloth mask over a surgical mask offers more protection against the coronavirus, as does tying knots on the ear loops of surgical masks. This has resulted in new CDC guidelines for Americans on improving mask fit, which includes adding layers of material to a mask (either by using cloth masks with multiple layers of fabric, or by wearing a disposable mask under a cloth mask).

This change comes as new, more contagious COVID-19 variants are circulating. So far, the Public Health Agency of Canada has not changed its recommendations on mask use in Canada. In November 2020, PHAC did update its recommendations to say non-medical masks should be made of at least three layers, with the middle layer being a filter-type fabric.

Currently in Ontario, you must wear a non-medical mask or face covering that covers your nose, mouth and chin inside any business or public place. Properly wearing a mask inside public spaces and maintaining 2 metres physical distance from others are important measures to reduce the spread of COVID-19. Masks will not stop you from getting COVID-19, but can help protect others.

While there is no instruction to ‘double mask’ in Canada, consider doing so if it makes you feel more comfortable (taking care to ensure it does not make breathing difficult). Add an extra layer to your cloth mask or try wearing a cloth mask over a disposable mask.

The best advice to prevent COVID-19 remains staying home as much as possible and avoiding contact with other people you do not live with.


How to Properly Use a Homemade Mask/Face Covering:  
  • Wash your hands immediately before putting it on and immediately after taking it off (use good hand hygiene while wearing it too)
  • Masks should fit snugly, but comfortably against your face (non-gaping) allowing you to breathe without restriction. Masks should be secured with ties or ear loops and have multiple fabric layers
  • Do not share cloth masks with others
  • Remember not to touch or rub your eyes while wearing it
  • Avoid moving, adjusting or touching your mask while using it, as it could become contaminated on the outside. 
  • Change face coverings if they get slightly wet or dirty
  • Wash the cloth mask after each use as it can get damp or dirty:
    • Put it directly into the washing machine or a bag that can be emptied into the washing machine and then disposed of
    • Cloth masks can be laundered with other items using a hot cycle, and then dried thoroughly.
    • Wash your hands with soap and water after putting the mask into the laundry.
  • Homemade masks that cannot be washed should be thrown out in a properly lined garbage bin as soon as they get damp, dirty or crumpled. Do not throw used masks on the ground or in a shopping cart. Immediately after wash your hands with soap and water.
  • For ideas on making your own homemade cloth masks, visit this Public Health Agency of Canada masks resource page.

Summary Do’s and Don’ts for Using Homemade Masks/Face Coverings

Do:

  • Wash your hands immediately before putting on and immediately after taking off a face covering or face mask
  • Practise good hand hygiene while you are wearing the face covering
  • Make sure the face covering fits well around your nose and mouth
  • Avoid moving the mask around or adjusting it often
  • Avoid touching the covering while using it
  • Change the face covering or face mask when it gets slightly wet or dirty

Do Not:

  • Share face coverings or face masks with others
  • Place on children under the age of two years or on anyone unable to remove without assistance or who has trouble breathing
  • Use plastic or other non-breathable materials as a face covering or face mask

Service Providers Working With Vulnerable Clients

It’s essential to slow the spread of COVID-19, especially to vulnerable clients. If you are a service provider working with vulnerable clients, you can access link/resources below to protect the health of staff, volunteers and clients. 

  • NEW: As of 12:01 am on Friday, July 16, Ontario will move into Step Three of its reopening plan with fewer restrictions in place. Click here for details.
General Tips
  • Access  short Health Unit video modules  on how to keep your workplace/organization safe during COVID-19. 
  • Screen your staff/ volunteers and clients for COVID-19 symptoms before they start work or enter the building. Use these online Provincial COVID-19 Screening Tools for Employees/Workers and for Customers/Clients. You can also use this screening tool from the HKPR District Health Unit.
  • Encourage your staff and volunteers to get their COVID-19 vaccine so they are fully protected against the virus.
  • Maintain a clean and safe environment 
  • Staff and volunteers MUST stay home when sick 
  • Post signs on wearing a mask/face covering, washing hands with soap and water, and covering sneezes/coughs.
  • Practise physical distancing 
  • Increase surface cleaning/ disinfection especially on high-touch surfaces 
  • Clients/participants MUST NOT share items (e.g. drinking cups, utensils) 
  • Develop an organizational plan to protect your staff, volunteers and clients from getting COVID-19. Consider how to: provide isolation for those who require it, modify service delivery based on staff capacity, and reduce fears, barriers and stigma around COVID-19 by providing credible information.
  • Prepare and plan for operations with reduced staff and fewer volunteers. Also consider services that may need to quickly decrease or ramp up depending on the situation.
  • Contact 211 Community Support to find/search government and community-based services during COVID-19.  Call or text 2-1-1 day or night to find support for all of life’s challenges. Live Chat also available Monday to Friday from 7 am to 9 pm. 

For Homeless Shelters and Service Providers 

For Food Banks/Food Program Providers 

If you are feeling ill, stay at home and away from others

Vaccine

Physical Distancing: 

  • Change the layout of your centre so there is enough space for staff, volunteers and clients to maintain physical distance
  • Remove client wait areas. Get people to wait outdoors (weather permitting). Use pylons or tape spaced 2 metres apart to guide clients on where to stand in line. 
  • Mark or assign work stations so that staff/volunteers can maintain a 2-metre distance apart.
  • Limit the number of clients in the centre at one time.
  • Stagger arrivals and departures to reduce client contact.
  • Allow staff and volunteers to fill out any forms or paperwork on behalf of clients. (NOTE: Clients must be able to view and verbally verify the information documented is correct. Staff and volunteers cannot sign on behalf of a client.)  
  • Extend hours or open on additional days so clients can be spread out.  

Hand Hygiene and Respiratory Etiquette 

  • Wash hands with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer often. Do this before and after receiving items and making packages for delivery.
  • Provide alcohol-based hand sanitizer (60-90% concentration) and tissues at all entrances and work stations.
  • Remind staff, volunteers and clients to sneeze or cough into the bend of their elbow or into a tissue. Used tissue must be thrown  into the trash. Wash or sanitize hands after.

Masks/Face Coverings

  • Wear a mask or face covering. NOTE: Face coverings must be worn inside all public spaces (unless exempted due to age or health reasons)
  • Develop a policy and protocols for your organization on mask use.
  • Educate staff and volunteers on proper use and disposal of masks.

Cleaning and Disinfecting

  • Increase surface cleaning and disinfecting on high-touch surfaces (E.g. doorknobs, light switches, all phones, counters, handles on cabinets, fridges, utility or grocery carts, pens, computers stations, etc.) 
  • Use only disinfectants that have an 8-digit Drug Identification Number (DIN). The DIN means a product is approved by Health Canada for use in this country. Click here for a specific list of hard-surface disinfectants that are known to be effective against COVID-19. Chlorine bleach may also be used as a disinfectant.
  • Follow manufacturer’s instructions for the safe use of products for cleaning or disinfecting. This includes ensuring disinfectants are left on surfaces/items for the proper length of time to be effective.  

Food Distribution Considerations: 

  • Contact the client ahead of time to arrange a delivery/pickup time.
  • Let staff and volunteers handle the food for clients. Pre-pack food boxes or bags based on clients’ wishes and pass out food at the door. Food boxes or bags may need to be smaller or lighter for easier delivery/carrying.
  • If delivering packages for clients:
    • Wash or sanitize hands before the delivery.
    • Drop off the package at the client’s door without entering their home.
    • If staff/volunteer must enter the home, put on a mask before entering.  Avoid touching surfaces in the client’s home.  Maintain 2m distance from other people in the home. Wash or sanitize hands when leaving the client’s home. 

Additional Resources

Download and print resources below:

Fact Sheet: Take Care of Yourself and Each Other – Public Health Ontario

Holidays, Family Gatherings and Celebrations

On This Page


Key Message: Stay Safe and Follow Public Health Measures

Stay safe! Please continue to follow all public health measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19. As more people are vaccinated for COVID-19, restrictions will be eased allowing for more in-person gatherings and travel opportunities.

As of Friday, July 16, when Ontario moves into Step Three of its reopening plan:

  • Up to 25 people are now allowed at indoor social gatherings and organized public events.
  • A maximum of 100 people is permitted for outdoor social gatherings and organized public events.
  • Retirement homes are exempt from gathering limits.
  • Masks must be worn at organized indoor public events. Physical distancing (staying 2 metres apart from others outside your household) is also required at organized indoor public events.
  • While Step Three does not require masks to be worn at social gatherings inside private homes, face coverings are required in common areas (hallways) in multi-unit dwellings like apartments, condominiums, etc. . Wearing a mask indoors regardless of where you are can reduce the spread of COVID-19.
  • To reduce your risk of COVID-19, continue to practise physical distancing at any gathering you attend.

If you are still uncertain about gathering with others, consider celebrating virtually or connect by phone instead.


General Tips for Holidays, Celebrations and Family Gatherings
  • Stay home if sick. Use Ontario’s online COVID-19 assessment tool to help determine if you need further care.
  • Ensure you are fully vaccinated against COVID-19. Ask others attending the gathering what their vaccination status is, so you can take appropriate precautions such as wearing a mask and staying two metres apart from others outside your household.
  • COVID-19 is less likely to be spread outdoors than in, so consider meeting others outdoors. If meeting inside, open windows and doors to allow for good ventilation.
  • Follow food safety tips if preparing a meal for your immediate household.
  • ‘Visit’ virtually with family and friends, if you believe it is a safer way to connect. Pick up the phone or chat via social media and/or video-conferencing. Consider using these platforms to hold a virtual holiday party/celebration. If technology is not your thing, send a card or write a letter to a loved one.
  • Look after your mental health and that of your loved ones, especially people who may be alone and feel cut off from others.
  • Avoid the “3 C’s” – closed spaces, crowded places and close faces. 
  • Practise physical distancing as much as possible. Keep a 2 metre (6-foot) distance from anyone who is outside your household.
  • Always wear a mask or face covering inside public places (unless exempted). Face coverings should fit tightly, covering the nose, mouth and chin (scarves and bandanas are insufficient).
  • Wearing a mask or face covering is now recommended outdoors when you can’t physically distance more than two metres from others outside your household. 

Visited Our COVID-19 Vaccine Clinic? Have Your Say

Help us improve the visitor experience at our COVID-19 mass vaccination clinics. Please complete the Health Unit’s short, online survey.

Why?

  • Share your experiences attending a Health Unit clinic
  • Tell us how we did and what we can do better
  • Participation is voluntary. You can stop the survey at any time
  • All responses are confidential and anonymous

Who?

  • Complete the survey if you were vaccinated at a Health Unit clinic OR attended as a caregiver/support person
  • Survey covers Health Unit-run mass vaccination clinics in Cobourg, Minden, Haliburton, Fenelon Falls and Campbellford
  • Survey does not include clinic at the Lindsay Exhibition (operated by Ross Memorial Hospital) and vaccinations provided at pharmacies, care homes and other settings

How?

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